Sunday Stories: Episode 8

Sunday Stories: Episode 8


♪♪ Michael: Welcome to Sunday
Stories, I’m Michael Sanford. Over the next hour we’ll be
sharing stories that celebrate the rich history, amazing
people, and fascinating places throughout our region and
beyond. Michael: 5, 4, 3…
Camera 1 start your push, ready 1, take 1… that’s how our director
communicates with the crew during our productions. Today, in our lead
story, we’ll see how local students are learning how
to direct, appear on camera, and use other creative skills
and techniques to share their stories in an immersive media
production academy. Alright, here we go:
3, 2, 1… Michael: THE NEWSCAST IS
CREATED IN CENTER HIGH SCHOOL’S
STATE-OF-THE-ART TV STUDIO, GIVING STUDENTS THE
OPPORTUNITY TO EXPERIENCE A REAL-WORLD TELEVISION
PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENT. Juliet: Here’s
the news you can use for Thursday,
January 25th, 2018. Probably the most fun is
being able to work with everybody in that
Advanced Broadcast. We all work
together pretty well, we do all of
these crazy projects, and we get help
from everybody, everybody
supports each other. It’s, it’s really awesome
to be able to work here. Bisho: My number one job
is just getting students to care about what they’re doing. And once they care, I just
have to keep out of their way. Alright. Can we do that
last sequence again? Michael: Students creating
and sharing stories, later on Sunday Stories. We’ll also visit with
The Haggin Museum’s CEO Tod Ruhstaller, who
introduces us to the museum’s major works of art, and
collections that honor Stockton’s hometown history –
including the Stephens Bros Boat archives and a collection of
Caterpillar Tractors. Rob: The famous Stephens
Brothers Boats. Tod: Right here! ♪♪ Tod: World famous, all made in
Stockton between 1902 and when the closed their
doors in 1987, and we have all of the
Stephens Brothers Archives here at the museum. Rob: Really! Tod: Architect drawings,
photographs, whole files on the
majority of the vessels they built over that
period of time. Rob: Another thing
invented in Stockton? The Caterpillar Tractor! Tod: Right! And some people say,
Stockton’s motto should say, “Home of the
Caterpillar Tractor.” Michael: Rob Stewart takes us
inside the Haggin Museum, later on Sunday Stories. Bhangra is a traditional
Punjab dance celebrating the harvest.
It’s often performed at weddings and birthdays.
We’ll take you to Yuba City where students are
learning the high energy dance as it continues
to gain popularity. Harjeet: No, it’s
not just for only Sikhs and Punjabis. For everybody, it’s a
mainstream dance because why is mainstream
Bhangra getting popular? First of all, it’s a
very cardio exercise. You burn a
lot of calories, ♪♪ Then here starting
early 80s, starting people,
starting doing Bhangra, they’re starting doing
Bhangra competitions. Michael: The traditions and art
of Punjab dance, ahead on Sunday
Stories. The Sacramento choir
Reconciliation Singers: Voices of Peace is
inspiring audiences through the power of music.
Each year the vocal ensemble of professional musicians brings
the community together to help a different
local charity. ♪ There’s a better home
awaiting, ♪ ♪ if we try lord if we try. ♪ Jennifer: It’s so important
for people to realize just how much need there is in their
communities that goes unseen every single day.”
♪ …“when I’m gone…” ♪ Jennifer: It’s just not typical
to give all the money away, but there’s also nothing like it
and the impact you can have is extraordinary.
And if we all did it across the country just
imagine how many people would be helped. Michael: Singing
for the community, later on Sunday Stories. A one-woman operation
turns wool into yarn. The hardest working dogs
on the farm. A step-father and daughter
tackle the coffee business
together. There’s a lot of focus on
“digital” in everything we do these days, including in school. And kids are using digital media
in their daily lives at a younger age.
Digital media classes aren’t just offered to college and
high school students anymore. Immersive media programs are
now helping students learn video production and editing
skills in elementary school. ♪♪ Michael: THE DAY
BEGINS BEFORE DAWN FOR VERNON BISHO’S ADVANCED
MEDIA PRODUCTION STUDENTS AT CENTER HIGH SCHOOL
IN SACRAMENTO COUNTY. Emmy: We get here about 6:45,
school actually starts about 7:40, 7:45, so we’re
here about an hour before everyone else is. Bisho: Morning, Adele. Adele: Morning Bisho. Michael: THE STUDENTS
ARE HERE EVERY MORNING, FIVE DAYS A WEEK, TO PRODUCE
THE SCHOOL’S DAILY NEWSCAST. Bisho: Right here. Keep going. Back up, back up. Let’s just take
it from the top. My zero-period class
is the advanced class, where there’s a
lot less lecture, where I’m not giving them
an assignment that they all do together. The students are pretty
much immersed in media. Alright, here we go:
3, 2, 1… Michael: THE NEWSCAST IS
CREATED IN CENTER HIGH SCHOOL’S
STATE-OF-THE-ART TV STUDIO, GIVING STUDENTS THE
OPPORTUNITY TO EXPERIENCE A REAL-WORLD TELEVISION
PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENT. Your School. Your Stories. The news you can use. Dyson: What we do every day is
the News You Can Use. What it is is it tells all
of our students and teachers and parents what
goes on around campus. Any, basically,
news that you can use. Anchors: So stay tuned
because you don’t want to miss this. Cougar Connection
starts now. Bisho: Ok, let’s stop. What’s going on
with all the cameras? Students: That
says camera one. Bisho: Camera one? Ok, well that’s right. It wasn’t on one. It was on three
the whole time. Michael: THIS ISN’T JUST
ANOTHER ELECTIVE CLASS. STUDENTS HAVE TO APPLY TO
BE A PART OF CENTER HIGH’S MEDIA AND
COMMUNICATIONS ACADEMY, ALSO KNOWN AS MCA. FROM SOPHOMORE
THROUGH SENIOR YEAR, STUDENTS IN THE ACADEMY
STAY TOGETHER AND TAKE CORE CLASSES WITH THE
SAME TEACHERS. Bisho: You’re building your
story to that moment. We do all sorts of
cross-curricular projects. So, for example, you
might have a project about a historical event in history
and then you have to write an essay about
it in English, and then you’ll have to do
a power-point about it in Spanish. So, it’s all cross-
curricular and I love it. Michael: THIS ACADEMY IS
PART OF A STATEWIDE MODEL CALLED THE CALIFORNIA
PARTNERSHIP ACADEMIES. IT’S ONE OF 340
ACADEMIES ACROSS THE STATE, OFFERING SUBJECTS AS DIVERSE
AS BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY, HEALTH SCIENCES,
ENGINEERING AND DESIGN, AND MEDIA. Bisho: The Partnership Academy
was an experiment to try to find innovative ways to teach
students and reach at-risk students, keep
them involved, and then get them into
college – particularly as career-focused. Michael: WHILE BISHO
TECHNICALLY PRODUCES THE NEWSCAST, THE STUDENTS
HANDLE EVERYTHING ELSE FROM DIRECTING… TO APPEARING ON-CAMERA. Juliet: Hello
Center High School. I’m Juliet and here’s
the news you can use for Thursday,
January 25th, 2018. Probably the most fun is
being able to work with everybody in that
Advanced Broadcast. We all work
together pretty well, we do all of
these crazy projects, and we get help
from everybody, everybody
supports each other. It’s, it’s really awesome
to be able to work here. Bisho: My number one job
is just getting students to care about what they’re doing. And once they care, I just
have to keep out of their way. Alright. Can we do that
last sequence again? And I’ll stay
out of the way. Make sure you guys are on
the right camera this time. Michael: CENTER HIGH’S
PROGRAM BECAME SO POPULAR BISHO BEGAN LOOKING
FOR WAYS TO EXPAND IT. Bisho: About eight or
nine years ago, I started doing workshops
for elementary school students to find out what
kind of interest elementary students had in
video production. And they’re crazy about it. They love it. I met with the
GATE teachers, the gifted and talented
teachers at the elementary school, and asked them if
they’d like to do after school programs
incorporating video. All he had to do was say he
wanted to do something with TV production and I was so
excited to be able to bring that back to kids here. Michael: SUSAN ERICKSON
TEACHES THE AFTER-SCHOOL MEDIA CLASS AT OAK
HILL ELEMENTARY, JUST A COUPLE OF MILES
FROM CENTER HIGH SCHOOL. THE DISTRICT HOPES TO CREATE
A PIPELINE FOR K-12 STUDENTS INTERESTED IN MEDIA. Michael: There are four
positions: A, B, C, and D, and I’m A. I did a “How to Play
Handball” instructional video, and a documentary on
how sunscreen affects coral reefs. Isaac: I’m working on something
called “CPR for Kids,” which is like, most people think
you have to be older like a grown up or older than 21
years old to do CPR but it actually doesn’t matter
how old you have to be. Susan: These are 4th, 5th and
6th graders who are coming up with these ideas. These students are from nine
years old to 12 years old, and they’re
working in teams, sometimes multi-age as well. Whatever passion
appeals to them, we let them roll with it. Kelly: Right now I’m actually
working on one with three other people, we’re doing a
clay stop-motion video on car pollution and how
it affects us and the environment. Oh no. We’re going
to move it this way, Michael: MENTORSHIP IS
A LARGE PART OF MCA. NOT ONLY DO
STUDENTS HELP EACH OTHER, BUT SEVERAL OF MR. BISHO’S
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TRAVEL TO OAK HILL EACH WEEK TO
MENTOR MRS. ERICKSON’S ELEMENTARY STUDENTS. Juliet: Make sure, talk to
Calvin when you say “I’m working on it.” So, you say “Not yet,
but I am working on it. And you all…” So, you have to go back to
where it’ll say “wait four seconds.” Know what I mean? Alright. It’s really cool when the
high schoolers come here because they are kind-of
like pros and they get to help us. So, it’s pretty cool. Juliet: I help them work on
writing a script, figuring out all the types
of shot angles that they want to get, and helping
them go out and get those angles and all the shots
and everything they need, help them with
editing, publishing. I do the whole jig
with them and I love it. Bisho: When they work with the,
the younger kids and help them teach, they become better
and they’re more invested personally. So, it’s a win-win. Michael: THE SCHOOLS’
NEWSCASTS ARE AT THE HEART OF BOTH MEDIA PROGRAMS. AT OAK HILL, THE WEEKLY
PROGRAM IS CALLED THE OTTER OUTLOOK. Kelly: Good morning, Otters. I hope you’re having a
marvelous Monday so far. I’m Kelly. And I’m Michael… Susan: Our Otter Outlook is
probably the most exciting thing that the kids get to
do weekly because they’re running a news show. And we have a news team that
goes out and actually films in classrooms. All the teacher has to do
is give us a call a day in advance, let us know
about activities such as buddies working together,
special art activity, science activity, our
news crew is on it. Calvin: Every week you’re
doing something else. So you can be the
cameraman, the director, the teleprompter
worker, or the anchor. Michael: THE
HANDS-ON SKILLS, THE TEAMWORK AND THE
CLOSE-KNIT COMMUNITY NOT ONLY INSPIRE THE KIDS,
BUT THE TEACHERS AS WELL. Susan: Everything they come up
with has no boundaries to them. They don’t see walls or stop
signs in anything they do. And so, that just makes you
just excited to make sure whatever they come up with,
it’s gonna happen for them. We’re gonna work real
hard to get it done. Juliet: It’s amazing to be able
to look back and I’ll be like, “Wow! I really have come so
far because of MCA.” Joining MCA was one of the
best choices I’ve ever made. That’s it for the News
You Can Use. Back to you, ladies. See you next time! ♪♪ Michael: Later… history
and treasures inside The Haggin Museum
in Stockton. You or someone you
know probably owns something made from wool. And while most of us know that
wool is sourced from a variety of animals, including sheep,
rabbits and llamas – few of us have probably seen how
the wool is turned into yarn. In today’s profile, we head
to Woodland to meet Marcail McWilliams, owner
and operator of Valley Oak Wool Mill
to get a first-hand look. Marcail: After I graduated high
school, I had it in my mind I was going to go to
San Francisco and become a fashion designer. And that did not
happen (laughs). ♪♪ My name is Marcail
McWilliams and I turn
wool into yarn. Narr: You might say that
turning wool into yarn is the fabric of Marcail
McWilliams’ life, and it’s a passion she
loves to share. Marcail: Why don’t you
guys come on in. Narr: For Marcail, working
with wool was a seed that was planted early on. Marcail: Actually, I want
to take that out. Marcail: I remember coming to
what was Yolo Wool Mill as a small child, I think maybe
six years old, and all I really remember is being
in the barn and she had wool stacked from floor to
ceiling, just bales and bales of wool, and it
just was like, whoa! That’s a lot of
wool! (laughs) After I graduated high
school I did attend California College of the
Arts, but I did not major in Fashion, I
majored in Textiles. Basically, at the end of
the class I was like, well, I know what I don’t
want to do (laughs)! Narr: Needing to figure
things out, Marcail joined a volunteer farming
program where she traveled the world working
on farms in exchange for room and board. After returning to
Woodland three years later, a family friend
suggested she re-visit the old Yolo Wool Mill. Marcail: So, I came here, and I
met with Jane, who was the owner at that time and I got
really excited and was just like, do you
take interns or apprentices or volunteers? She was like, “Well, I have
a paid position if you’d want it.” And yeah, I wanted it. So I started working here
and worked here for about seven years. Narr: Jane eventually
retired, which opened the door for Marcail to start
her own business in 2017. Robin: So I’ve got
Jacob wool here. Marcail: Great, Ok. Great, Ok, I’ll help
you bring them in. Marcail: My average customer
is typically women that have their own sheep. Marcail: Yeah. Robin: Wool in
black and white. I sorted the white into
one bag, and then the other is the mixed colors. Marcail: Good. Marcail: I can process as little
as one to two sheep, depending on the breed and
how much wool they yield, but I have people that
have up to, like, a hundred sheep sometimes. Robin: So this will
all blend to gray. Marcail: Right. Cool.
Yeah, Ok! Let me weigh that up. Robin: She definitely knows
her limitations for what kinds of fiber she can
take, what kinds of products she can produce,
and so she wants to let the customer know that and
not take on something that isn’t going to make
anybody happy. Robin: What I think I’m going to
do is, is skein them how I learned last weekend
to present it for a sale product. Marcail: Ok. Narr: And while customer
satisfaction is always her number one priority,
Marcail admits running a business of this size by
herself can sometimes get a little overwhelming. Marcail: This is a
one-woman operation, so I’m doing
everything myself. I answer every email. I answer every phone call,
try and be on time with phone calls. (laughs) But, yeah, I do everything
from opening, closing. One of the things that’s
been the hardest is just finding help with
these machines. This machinery is as old
as eighty years old and so things break down.
It does happen. And then I
have to fix it. So, I feel like
Rosie the Riveter. I just pick up a wrench. I’m like, we can do it! This is what
we’ve got to do. ♪♪ Narr: Starting any
business requires dedication and sacrifice. Marcail has already proven
to her customers she has the chops to make Valley
Oak Wool Mill a success. Robin: What Marcail does takes
a lot of business sense, a lot of mechanical ability
and knowledge of the fiber. So it’s not a
low-level job. There’s a lot of skill and
knowledge involved in it. Marcail: Every small business is
going to be hard in the beginning, I think it’s
going to be hard for maybe even a number of years. It is my desire to
grow the business. Eventually, I’ll have to
hire somebody and I know
that’s expensive. I don’t know how God’s
going to work that out, but it’s going to happen,
I know that and I’m trusting in that. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ We’re so glad to be inside
the Haggin Museum with Tod Ruhstaller who is the CEO
here good to see you. Tod: It’s good seeing you
as well, welcome to the Haggin
Museum. Rob: Oh it’s been so nice just
to walk around with you and get a sneak peek and
now we’re going to show it to you because this place
is gorgeous, this is the Hull Room. Tod: This is the
Hull Gallery, yes. Rob: And inside this gallery
is home is one of your most prized collections, and
that’s just one of. Tod: The Haggin Museum is home
to one of the largest collections of major works
by the Hudson River School artist Alfred Bierstadt. Rob: Those are 6 of his
major completed works, that’s what sets you
apart. Tod: That is true. Rob: Well one of them hung
in a very famous location. Let’s start with that. Tod: Perfect. Rob: Come on. ♪♪ Rob:This is the Bierstadt
that hung in which president’s office? I’ll give you a
second to guess. That’s a second,
President Ronald Reagan. Tod: Exactly, during his
first administration, they could pick paintings
from any museum, they came to us and they
asked to have this to hang during his first administration
in the Roosevelt Room. Rob: Is this Bierstadt
in the front? Tod: It is, he painted
himself in, you can see he’s making
sketches taking a look down the valley, you have
Half Dome and the rest of the absolutely majestic
Yosemite Valley and this is one of 5 Yosemite
scenes that we have in our collection. Rob: So why are Beirstadt’s
Yosemite scenes some of the most famous, did he
have anything to do with popularizing Yosemite
nationally? Tod: He did. He was very early on the
scene in the 1860s he was in the park long before it
because a national park and his paintings were
displayed back east and got a lot of people
thinking, you know maybe I should
hop on that train and travel for about a week to
go see Yosemite. Rob: Wow. Tod: This is one of my favorite
paintings in the museum. I grew up in Stockton and
I wasn’t a big art aficionado when I was
young and I was always struck by the Yosemite
scenes and of course as a kid we would travel to
Yosemite and I could see all of the truth in his
painting when I would actually visit Yosemite. Rob: I love that, you saw the
truth in his painting and then actually you saw the
truth in your life, because this painting and
his works helped call you to your career. Tod: Yes they did. I hadn’t thought about it
that way, but yes. ♪♪ Rob: If you were to walk
all the way through that painting, looking up
Yosemite Valley, and turn around, this is
what you would see. Tod: With the sun going down,
sunset in the Yosemite Valley, probably the most
dramatic Bierstadt that we have in our collection. When visitors first come
to the museum, if you were to watch them
as they first walk into this room, they’re drawn
to this one, because it is so dramatic. ♪♪ Rob: When you walk in the Hull
Gallery you see this right in front of you, this
beautiful mantle, and it makes me think that
this would have been a home in the past. Tod: It makes many of our
visitors think that this used to be somebody’s home
and it was converted later on into a museum,
in point of fact, we’ve always been a
museum. Rob: And this was
brought from? Tod: This was brought from a
home on 5th Avenue in New York that belonged
to a gentleman named Louis Terah Haggin. And it is his name,
Haggin, that is associated with
our museum. Rob: Now why did they want to
pour their money into Stockton and to here? Tod: Well that’s interesting
because Eila Haggin had married in 1924 a
gentleman named Robert T. McKee, an
interior designer in New York, who just
happened to originally be from Stockton. Rob: Oh, okay, there
is the trace. Tod: That’s the Stockton
connection. Rob: Robert T. McKee knew his hometown
was struggling to build an art museum, and persuaded
his wife Eila to donate part of the family’s 10
million dollar estate to Stockton if a museum
would be built and named in honor of her father. It worked, paving the way
for the creation of the Haggin Museum. Tod: I now want to introduce
you to the Leyendecker Gallery. Rob: Oh this is beautiful,
look, those are the
Kellogg kids? Tod: The Kellogg’s Kids,
one of his more famous advertising campaigns. He was hired right at the
beginning of the 20th Century to help popularize
Kellogg’s Corn Flakes. Leyendecker is credited
for really helping to brand quite a number of
products in the United Stated during the first 4
decades of the 20th Century. Rob: That’s a long run! Tod: A very long run. This campaign ran until
just about the time the United States entered the
first World War, and if you take a look at
the faces, there are these winsome,
cherubic kids that the whole point of this was to
win the heart of the mothers who were then
going to go out and buy the cereal and why
wouldn’t you want your child to be as happy and
as contented as these kids seem to be in eating a big
bowl of Kellogg’s corn flakes. Rob: Would this have been
during the beginning of persuasive advertising
campaigns? Tod: Very much so. ♪♪ Rob: This was a gift from
Norman Rockwell to the Haggin Museum. Tod: Right, and the story
behind this is Norman Rockwell, the artist that
most Americans most closely associate with the
Saturday Evening Post, and this is a cover for
the Saturday Evening Post Magazine. Rob: But this is
a Leyendecker? Tod: But this is
a Leyendecker. J.C. Leyendecker was doing
covers for the Saturday Evening Post long before
Norman Rockwell, and more importantly,
Norman Rockwell looked upon J.C. Leyendecker not only as a
friend but as a mentor. ♪♪ Rob: The Haggin Museum
is art and history, history museum on this
side, and the famous Stephens
Brothers Boats. Tod: Right here! ♪♪ Tod: World famous, all made in
Stockton between 1902 and when the closed their
doors in 1987, and we have all of the
Stephens Brothers Archives here at the museum. Rob: Really! Tod: Architect drawings,
photographs, whole files on the
majority of the vessels they built over that
period of time. This particular vessel is
a 26 foot run-a-bout. Built in 1927 for a
gentleman by the name of Herbert Fleishhacker and
some of your viewers might remember when the San
Francisco Zoo was known as Fleishhacker Zoo,
well that was Herbert Fleishhacker. And he had this vessel up
at his summer home up in Lake Tahoe. Rob: Another thing
invented in Stockton? The Caterpillar Tractor! Tod: Right! And some people say,
Stockton’s motto should say, “Home of the
Caterpillar Tractor.” Rob: Well it would work,
because this is known world-wide. Tod: Exactly, because of the
track type tread. Rob: Why was that developed
this way, was it because of the soft
land? Tod: The land just to the west
of Stockton, tremendously fertile! It’s all reclaimed
Delta land, and the soil is soft,
rich peat soil. You can grow anything
in the world practically there. The problem when
it is wet, it is soft and spongy and
the big heavy machinery of the period had a tendency
to sink down. So Benjamin Holt took a
look at the problem and thought I’ve got to come
up with some mechanical means of getting more
surface bearing area to these machines without
adding appreciably to the weight. The oldest combine
harvester held by a museum is at the Smithsonian at
it’s a Stockton built side hill harvester, the second
oldest combine on display in the United States is
our 1904 Haynes Howser harvester. Rob: This one? Tod: This one right
behind you. Rob: How cool is that! So it’s this one and the
Smithsonian. Tod: And both made
in Stockton! Rob: That is fantastic! This is a beautiful
location, the Haggin Museum here in
Victory Park in Stockton is just spectacular. I had not been in here
before, and I am blown away. Tod: Well we want you
to come and visit again. Rob: I will. Tod: We want all of your
viewers to come and visit as well. ♪♪ ♪♪ Michael: We now turn to
The Vault for a classic California Heartland story that
introduces us to some of the hardest workers
on farms and ranches. They’re energetic and
intelligent, renowned for their excellent eyesight and
intense concentration. Van Gordon Sauter
introduces us to the Border Collie – the world’s
premier sheep herding dog. ♪♪ (Vault Opens) Bill: Bit’s, Bit’s, Bit’s,
Bit’s come by, come by. The Cowboys say a guy only
deserves to have one good dog. So I’ve been blessed.
I’ve had a bunch of them. Van: Meet bill and Margie
Scott, a couple in love with an amazing breed of herding dog,
the Border Collie. (Applause) While they occasionally take
their dogs to County fairs. Most of the time you will find
them on the rolling hills of a sheep and cattle
ranch near willows, a town North of Sacramento. What a face. Yes.
What a face. Border collies judged,
the most intelligent of all dogs are most
often found on working ranches. They’re fast, agile, even
tempered, and almost frighteningly smart Margie: Theres almost a way
that they can talk to you with their eyes and
their body language and they read your body
language so well. (whistling) Van: Border collies first went
to work in the rough country where England and Scotland
come together. They’ve been in California
for the past hundred years. Bill and Margie had been
breeding and training them
for twenty. Bill: A Border Collie can
do the work of several men on horseback and he don’t,
he doesn’t get drunk on Saturday night and he doesn’t
wreck the truck. But the border Collie is
really a very efficient way to move livestock around
on a ranch. A man on horseback and a
couple of good dogs can do all the work that several men
had to do before. Mitts. Come, Stand Still. Van: Bill commands his dogs with
the words and whistles of Scotland and his burr would
pass muster in the Highlands. Bill: A way to me
is to the right. Come by is to the left, walk up as bring the sheep
towards me. Stand still, Cap that’ll do,
Cap. (whistle) When I’m actually talking to the
dogs, it’s in a whisper. They hear better in a whisper. Much like people would listen to
a guy that doesn’t talk too much more than somebody that talks
loud. Van: Okay, Flashy, no asphalt,
no air pollution. Come on up. Enjoy the
countryside. Let’s go. I took my border Collie, Flash
up to the ranch. He’s great on a long hike or a
fishing trip. But the only domestic animals
he meets tend to be at cocktail parties.
Go on. Bill: come on, buddy
Van: Watch, watch. Bill: What I’m looking for Van
is for his tail to go down. Van: Come on, buddy Bill: Tails up. He’s
playing. Tails down between his legs.
He’s working. Looks like the old adage, it’s
hard to teach an old dog new tricks is maybe going to be
true today. Come on, joy, joy, joy. Van: Like all dogs. The training
must start early. At eight it’s too
late for Flash. Bill starts his pups when they
are only a few months old and some immediately show
signs of having the aptitude. Bill: See this little Brown pup
here. Every once in a while his tail will go down.
He’s thinking about it. Van: This is a dog, I suspect
will be either a good sheep dog and or a
good companion dog. This dog has a personality. Van: If for sale, these
rambunctious pups will
go out the door for $450. A trained, mature border Collie
average is $2,500 and the best of the breed consider rancher
back about $8,000 Bill: Well, if you think about
how, how long they work for you and how dedicated they are for
you, it’s pretty cheap labor. They cost you 50 cents
a day to feed. There’s nothing like the
bond. Between a dog, like a horse would be real close
with a bond to a real good horse that you know, horses or
something too. They really will do a lot for
you, but a dog and a good horse, you can get a lot
of work done. ♪♪ (Vault closing) Michael: Still ahead,
traditional Punjab folk dances that are gaining mainstream
popularity. Did you start your day off
with a cup of coffee? According to the National Coffee
Association 64% of American adults drink coffee
every day, and in 2015, U.S. consumers spent over
$74.2 billion on the product. So, it’s not surprising that
coffee shops would be the fastest growing niche in the
restaurant business. For our next story, we head
to Trail Coffee Roasters in Stockton, a café that grows
and roasts their own beans. Bing Kirk: I’m a
Baby Boomer and, uh, she is
a millennial. Gianna Vicari: Don’t
include that (Laughs). Bing Kirk: And I mean
it’s completely different, you know, worlds
that we’ve come from. Gianna Vicari:
Bing is my stepdad. So, um, sometimes we
clash but at the same time, I feel like we wouldn’t
be where we are without one another. ♪♪ Gianna Vicari: We are a
seed-to-cup coffee company. Meaning we grow the coffee,
roast the coffee and have a café where we
serve our coffee. Bing: The business actually
started 15 years ago. Employee: Hey,
how are you doing? Welcome to Trail. Bing Kirk: I was a
roaster as a hobby. I had the farm in Nicaragua,
and I had been importing coffee into the States
for like fifteen years. Narr: Bing’s time in
Nicaragua began with a short trip in 1976. Bing Kirk: I went for a
month and ended up staying two years. It was exciting, you know. When you’re at 28, 29
years old (laughs), I mean it’s a fun time. I got a job, I stayed,
and that’s when I got introduced to coffee. (Gunfire) And then unfortunately the
civil war came in 1978 when the Sandinistas
overthrew the Somoza regime and we all
had to leave. Narr: The Nicaraguan
revolution kept Bing out of Nicaragua for over two
decades – but it didn’t diminish his passion
for the coffee business. Bing Kirk: Fast-forward
to 2000… We went down there with
the intention of looking to buy some property, and
we were able to find this mountain called
Cerro de Jesús. So, we bought the
entire slope on the Nicaraguan side. So currently we have a
thousand-acre coffee farm. We have 70
full-time employees. During the harvest,
we have as, as many as 500 people. We noticed that there’s a
lot of kids that live up there but there
are no schools. The closest school is
like six kilometers away. So, we built a school. We built a church for
the local community. We’re well-known and
respected in the Nicaraguan community
where we are, so we take a lot of pride in that. Coffee that we’re able to
import and sell here it’s kind of helping sustain
what we have down there, because it’s, in the
coffee world is very tough these days. Gianna Vicari: It is
a competitive market, but I think what we have is
pretty unique and sets us apart from other
coffee companies. I think the fact that we
have our own coffee farm with all of our
crops in Nicaragua, and then you know,
we import it here to our roastery
in Stockton. Gianna Vicari: We have
two, uh, cafés. We have a flagship
location located in downtown Stockton, and a satellite
location near the University of Pacific
campus. Bing Kirk: We’ve created a
full-on bakery in the back. The stuff that’s created
there is just unbelievable. And now, I mean, that
business has just taken off. I know how it started
and to see it today, it just kind of
brings, you know, a smile to your face
because (laughs) we’re not only a
coffee shop, I mean, we’re known for our
baked goods now. Bing Kirk: We’re
doing more transactions. We’re building a brand. Customer: Alright,
thanks so much. Bing Kirk: And that’s
part of the excitement. Customer: That’s so good. Alright, thank you. Alright, bye. Narr: In addition to serving
up coffee by the cup, trail coffee roasters also
market their brand in select grocery stores. Gianna Vicari: We work
with a distribution company, and so, uh, they put us in
a lot of grocery markets. Bing Kirk: We’re in about
four hundred stores now. Gianna Vicari: Yeah,
four hundred plus. Gianna Vicari: I’ll have
customers reach out, um, all the time, you know,
who live in other cities just saying how much
they enjoyed the coffee, and the branding caught
their eye and then they brought the coffee
home and how good the coffee actually tasted. Yeah, it’s pretty cool to
get that kind of feedback from people who
aren’t from Stockton. Gianna Vicari: You know,
we’re learning to kind of stick to our strengths. I get to curate all of our
menus and the specials that we have,
so I enjoy that. But it has been a
learning curve. Bing Kirk: I’m very proud
of Gianna and what she’s created down there. Gianna Vicari: I’m glad
we have this on camera, so I could show him. Bing Kirk: Yeah, you
can show this on camera. Gianna Vicari: Play
it back (Laughs). ♪♪ Bing Kirk: We’re going
against a lot of competition, and
our, you know, our sales growth there
has been phenomenal. I mean, our little roaster
is roasting five days a week just to keep up
with the demands, so we’re excited about that. Gianna Vicari: I think that
if you’re happy to have a business here and, like,
you’re proud of what you’re putting out there, then
other people want to get behind that and
support you as well. ♪♪ ♪♪ Harjeet: Traditionally,
we do Bhangra when farmers
completed the harvest. They get
together, they get money, they enjoy and have fun. ♪♪ Harjeet: Whenever I
tell them I teach Bhangra, “Oh, that’s
Bollywood dance.” That’s yes and no
because Bollywood is kind of different moves we do it but
Bhangra is just from state of Punjab. That’s the part I
need to define them. Left hand here, right up. Harjeet: But now, it’s
shifting from not just from Punjab, then here
starting early 80s, starting people,
starting doing Bhangra, they’re starting doing
Bhangra competitions. ♪♪ Harjeet: No, it’s
not just for only Sikhs and Punjabis. For everybody, it’s a
mainstream dance because why is mainstream
Bhangra getting popular? First of all, it’s a
very cardio exercise. You burn a
lot of calories, but I try to use both
Punjabi and English when I teach. Harjeet: If you’re
touching somebody, you need to move. Show me a smiling face. Over, down. Harjeet: And I use example,
like for example if I’m teaching teenagers
how to the move, how to use it, “Hey,
have you played soccer? Yeah, this is how to
kick in soccer, you use your leg like this. Oh, there’s some moves,
how you play basketball. Shoot hoop, how
you shoot three pointers, like do this.” They know that. Paramjeet: Bhangra, I can
say that it’s like aerobic exercise, so it’s up,
down, moving your neck, moving your
shoulder, but Giddha, you need flexibility in your
body to move your hip and your hand. ♪♪ Paramjeet: In Giddha, you need to have
that face expression, your hand gestures because
you are telling a story. ♪♪ Paramjeet: Here
in this community center, we are starting a class for
ladies and for the teenage girls. ♪♪ Paramjeet: Move leg up! Leg up, more up! Good. Paramjeet: It’s a ladies
dance and ladies usually perform at the weddings and
before the weddings or any occasion where they get
together and they start with a clap. Paramjeet: Move your
neck, move your necks out. Paramjeet: They stand in a
half semi circle and the lyrics has a meaning to it
or they are translating the story or they are joking
around with each other, talking about their mother
in law or their husband. ♪♪ If you don’t get that rhythm
in your body when you’re young, it’s hard to get it
when you are a teenager. Harsimran: Actually
when I first did it, I did not want
to do it at all. I was crying on the
first day of practice and my parents had to drag
me on the dance floor. Paramjeet: Since I
remember my childhood, I have always, I
loved dancing. I had never done Bhangra or
Giddha until I got married to Harjeet. Back in India
when I was studying, my parents, their main
motive was just get study, get higher education. Harjeet: Because normally
in an Indian parent, they wanted me to be
doctor or engineers don’t do Bhangra, they believe. Paramjeet: They
didn’t want me to dance. I always used to
wish, “Please God, give me a husband who
will never stop my dancing.” When I met him, his
first question was, “Do you know how to dance?” And I’m like, “Oh my
gosh, I got what I wanted!” Our passion are same,
our hobbies are same so we really enjoy and we spend
so much time together too because we both work
together teaching kids and I love it. ♪♪ Michael: For those who are
homeless, hope is often hard to find. In today’s Excerpt
From, we follow Sacramento choir Reconciliation Singers: Voices
of Peace as they give back to the community through concerts
that inspire hope and raise funds to support Joshua’s House
– the area’s first hospice care facility for terminally ill
homeless men and women. ♪♪ NARRATOR: A respite for
the homeless of Sacramento, this is Loaves and Fishes. It’s not surprising to find
the founder of Joshua’s House here – Marlene von
Friederichs-Fitzwater. At home with the homeless,
Marlene has learned deeply who these people are. MARLENE: Yeah, almost to
a person – and we’ve now interviewed close to 250
homeless men and women and the main fear is to
die alone on the street. So they already feel that
they’re forgotten and ignored no body
pays any attention or talk to them
it just kinda magnifies that fear that
they will end up dying alone. JENNIFER: One of my favorite
parts of this job is meeting the people who work
in these organizations. Unsung heroes,
all of them. And Marlene might be the
leader of that pack – she is founding something – she’s
starting something brand new and there’s not even
a template really on the West Coast. MARLENE – So tell me a
little about your health just generally. RICHARD: Health?
It’s deteriorating. I can read the
writing on the wall. I don’t need a
doctor to tell me. I can walk about
a hundred feet. Sometimes a hundred yards. And then it’s like climbing
the last ten steps of Mount Everest and K-2
at the same time. MARLENE: What is your
biggest fear about your condition? Physically and being homeless? RICHARD: Fear?
MARLENE: What are you most
afraid of? Where I’ll be found dead. HANNAH OZANIAN: So
every morning right here we have about 200 folks waiting
outside these gates waiting to get in so they can get a
hot cup of coffee so they can wake up after a long
hard night sleeping outside. But we do our best to
provide dignity and honor each life of all of our
guests because that’s one of the tenets of
Loaves and Fishes. JENNIFER: So this is a
really beautiful wall. Tell me about what it means. HANNAH: So this is our
memorial wall right at the hub of Friendship Park. We do this so our
guests are not forgotten. ♪(CHOIR IN BACKGROUND)♪
HANNAH: So many things in our daily lives are – just
not important at the end of the day and when folks
who have nothing who have nowhere to sleep who barely
have enough food to survive can still keep – keep a
positive perspective – it’s really inspiring. So – I’m the fortunate one
for being here to be able to witness and develop
these friendships. It’s really an honor. ♪(CHOIR IN BACKGROUND)♪
JENNIFER: I served at Loaves and Fishes as a
college student and it was a much smaller organization
back then and walking there now, a decade or so later
-it’s – the need is so huge. And the number of people
there is so much greater it was, really, quite shocking. JENNIFER: So the impact of
seeing how many names on the wall of people who had
passed, even there was just heart breaking. JENNIFER: Everyone
this is Marlene, founder of Joshua’s House –
we’re so honored to support all of your endeavors so
thank you for being here. MARLENE: Oh you bet thank you.
So thank you all for being here and being interested in Joshua’s
House – this will be the first Hospice facility for terminally
ill homeless people on the West coast and the seventh
one in the country -uh – So people are dying
on the streets. We lose now in Sacramento
somewhere between two to four people a week. Which is horrific
– It’s just horrible. I had a grandson,
my first grandson, who at the time was about 32
years old and when he was a teenager he became
addicted to drugs and became homeless. But we stayed
in close touch. So we would talk about the
situation the people he saw in other cities where he
would go to live on the street and people he’d meet
who were dying and when he died – on the streets in
Omaha of an overdose – his name was Joshua. He was an incredibly
smart, loving, gentle wonderful young man and he was
also a musician – so I’ll just pass these around
and you can take a look at them and meet Joshua. He was 34 when he died. He shared a lot of his feelings
his pain and his suffering in words and in writing so this is
from one of the letters. (READING) Grandma I have
been thinking – this is hard for me – Grandma I have been
thinking about why I”m here. What’s my purpose in life? I think in the big picture
the most important purpose for all of us it to love –
to love ourselves, to love each other
and to love the earth. To practice love in all
our aspects of our lives everyday with everyone. That’s our purpose. (TO THE GROUP) And that was
just his attitude he was a very loving and caring soul
who just couldn’t get past the addiction and
that’s what took him away. NARRATOR: A century old
warehouse near downtown is where Marlene’s vision
for Joshua’s House is taking shape. MARLENE (TO JENNIFER)
This is the space. and it’s almost a
hundred year old space. (JENNIFER – incredible) –
MARLENE: Before we started even thinking about it
I interviews about 150 homeless men and women and
did five focus groups with 35 homeless men and women
and said “if you were dying and had a place to go,
what would it look like, what would it smell like
what would it feel like? And kinda their number
one priority was to bring nature in. So to bring plants and
sunlight and kinda natural things in. And the other one that they
all said was – we don’t want to be reminded we’re poor
and homeless. So to be sure it’s
a quality place. So just an example that
entire wall will be a greenery wall with live plants
and then, uh, as you come in
the entrance there’ll be a water wall and there’ll be those
kind of features throughout. JENNIFER: It’s amazing
to see such an expanse and to know
the possibilities of what that will be. And the more we walked
through it she really painted a picture and I could see the
wall of greenery as she described it
and here will be the atrium and
here will be the kitchen… and by the time we were
done I had the feeling we were standing
in amongst it already. JENNIFER: A
rehearsal is usually we have a really great time it
is a chosen family of sorts. We have a lot of fun just
being together but then it’s also very challenging and
an incredible amount of work and I ask the world
of these singers. The music is very difficult
the work that needs to be done during the week is
extraordinarily huge the
standard of performance is quite high – the group is
very talented so I’m able to rely a lot on the singers to
go off in little groups and work themselves and
drill, drill – drill. And then as the season goes
on music starts to happen but in the beginning it’s
a lotta work. ♪ Laid my frown and
my burdens dooowwn ♪ ♪ putin’ on my crown♪ ♪ on my way –
ay – ay -ay yes!♪ JENNIFER: I think the
hardest but also the most fun part of this job
is picking the repertoire. We try to tailor every
concert to the particular charity so their
mission is highlighted. JENNIFER: So far example
we’re doing Joshua’s House this season so a lot of our
songs are about passing on about the great beyond
about heaven about leaving earth behind. (CHOIR SINGS)
♪ I’m going back to
see my mother – – -♪ JENNIFER: This
is a special, very special group in that not only
extremely talented but unified in the sense
that everyone is there for the same reason. Everyone is there
because the care about the community, they care
to help the needy and they care to make a
difference so they come in very selflessly. ♪♪ (APPLAUSE) JENNIFER: This concert in
particular I think will be meaningful in the sense
we’re dealing with hospice care
for the homeless. The impact of that
is tremendous. I think by the time this is
done we will all be changed. JENNIFER: Homelessness
is absolutely exploding. In having conversations with
them we spent a lot of time talking and hearing their
stories and they would say to me you have
no idea what it’s like just to not be seen. No one looks at me. Another man said no
one even knows my name. And I can’t think of
a better description of being a stranger
is – then that. (CHOIR SINGING)
♪ I’m just a poor
wayfaring stranger.♪ ♪ a travelin’ through
this land of woe. ♪ ♪ But there’s no sickness,
toil or danger in that fair ♪ ♪ land to which I’d go. ♪ ♪ I’m going back –
to see my mother. ♪ ♪ I’m going back
no more to roam. ♪ NARRATOR: Serving
lunch to the homeless is one way to discover that we are all
connected in the circle of life. SINGER: ♪ will the
circle be unbroken ♪ ♪ by and by lord
by and by… ♪ ♪ There’s a better home
awaitin’ if we try Lord,♪ ♪ if we try…. ♪ ♪ will the circle be
unbroken by and by Lord, ♪ ♪ by and by. ♪ ♪ There’s a better
home awaitin’ ♪ ♪ if we try Lord
if we try… ♪ JENNIFER: It’s very
eye-opening and also very humanizing. I think we’re conditioned
in big cities to just walk right by,
and to not see. There’s always somebody
asking you for money on the street whenever
you stop your car. I think we are conditioned
to not look and people get desensitized to the need
right in front of their face and possibly build up some
prejudices as well they must be drug addicts they must be
out of their mind. You know something
must be very wrong. They’re very lesser – how
they’ve done something to themselves to have
ended up on the street. But when you’re on the
other end and you’re serving them food and you
look them in the eye and they’re so grateful and the
speak to you like there’s no difference at all and you
remember that there’s no difference at all. It could just as easily
be me on that side of the counter and them serving me. ♪ There’s a better home
awaitin’ if we try Lord,♪ ♪ if we try…. ♪ (APPLAUSE) ♪♪ Michael: To watch the full story
go to kvie.org/SundayStories or download the
free PBS video app. I’m Michael Sanford. It’s been
a pleasure being part of your Sunday. We hope you’ve
enjoyed today’s stories and that you’ll be back next time
for another episode of Sunday Stories. Until
then, have a great week. ♪♪ ♪♪

About the Author: Garret Beatty

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